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A “La Niña-like” state occurring in the second year after large tropical volcanic eruptions during the past 1500 years

Journal article
Authors Weiyi Sun
Jian Liu
Bin Wang
Deliang Chen
Fei Liu
Zhiyuan Wang
Liang Ning
Mingcheng Chen
Published in Climate Dynamics
Volume 52
Issue 12
Pages 7495-7509
ISSN 0930-7575
Publication year 2019
Published at Department of Earth Sciences
Pages 7495-7509
Language en
Links doi.org/10.1007/s00382-018-4163-x
Keywords CESM, ENSO, Impacts of volcanic eruption, Volcano-induced La Niña, WNPAC
Subject categories Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Abstract

© 2018 The Author(s) Using an ensemble of nine El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) reconstructed proxies and volcano eruption proxies for the past 1500 years, this study shows that a significant La Niña state emerges in the second year (year (2) hereafter) after large tropical volcanic eruptions. The reasons for the development of La Niña are investigated using the Community Earth System Model (CESM). In the volcanic eruption experiment (Vol), a robust La Niña signal occurs in year (2), resembling the proxy records. The eastward positioning of the western North Pacific anomalous anticyclone (WNPAC) in Vol plays a critical role in the advanced decay of year (2) warming and the strong intensification of cooling in the equatorial eastern Pacific. The enhanced easterlies located on the southern edge of the WNPAC can stimulate consecutive oceanic upwelling Kelvin waves, shallowing the thermocline in the eastern Pacific, thereby resulting in a greater cooling rate by the enhanced thermocline feedback and cold zonal advection. Over the equatorial eastern Pacific, the reduced shortwave radiation contributes to the advanced decay of warming, while the upward latent heat flux augments the strong intensification of the cooling. Essentially, the eastward positioning of the WNPAC is a result of the volcanic forcing. The volcanic effect cools the maritime continent more than its adjacent oceans, thus pushing convective anomalies eastward during year (1). This induces vertical thermal advection and upward surface latent heat flux, thereby suppressing the development of warm Sea Surface Temperature over the central-western Pacific and causing the eastward positioning of the WNPAC in Vol.

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Denna text är utskriven från följande webbsida:
http://www.gu.se/english/research/publication/?publicationId=276389
Utskriftsdatum: 2019-10-18