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Export of calcium carbonate corrosive waters from the East Siberian Sea

Journal article
Authors Leif G Anderson
E. K. Jorgen
Y. Ericson
C. Humborg
I. Semiletov
M. Sundbom
Adam Ulfsbo
Published in Biogeosciences
Volume 14
Issue 7
Pages 1811-1823
ISSN 1726-4170
Publication year 2017
Published at Department of marine sciences
Pages 1811-1823
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-1811-2017
Keywords SEAWATER PH MEASUREMENTS, ARCTIC SHELF WATERS, OCEAN ACIDIFICATION, FRESH-WATER, CHEMISTRY DYNAMICS, ION CONCENTRATION, MARINE ORGANISMS, CRESOL PURPLE, CO2, CIRCULATION, Ecology, Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Subject categories Geology, Environmental Sciences

Abstract

The Siberian shelf seas are areas of extensive biogeochemical transformation of organic matter, both of marine and terrestrial origin. This in combination with brine production from sea ice formation results in a cold bottom water of relative high salinity and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO(2)). Data from the SWERUS-C3 expedition compiled on the icebreaker Oden in July to September 2014 show the distribution of such waters at the outer shelf, as well as their export into the deep central Arctic basins. Very high pCO(2) water, up to similar to 1000 mu atm, was observed associated with high nutrients and low oxygen concentrations. Consequently, this water had low saturation state with respect to calcium carbonate down to less than 0.8 for calcite and 0.5 for aragonite. Waters undersaturated in aragonite were also observed in the surface in waters at equilibrium with atmospheric CO2; however, at these conditions the cause of undersaturation was low salinity from river runoff and/or sea ice melt. The calcium carbonate corrosive water was observed all along the continental margin and well out into the deep Makarov and Canada basins at a depth from about 50 m depth in the west to about 150 m in the east. These waters of low aragonite saturation state are traced in historic data to the Canada Basin and in the waters flowing out of the Arctic Ocean north of Greenland and in the western Fram Strait, thus potentially impacting the marine life in the North Atlantic Ocean.

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http://www.gu.se/english/research/publication/?publicationId=253440
Utskriftsdatum: 2019-11-13