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Eliciting incriminating information from perpetrators in denial

Conference contribution
Authors Serra Tekin
Pär-Anders Granhag
Published in The 11th Meeting of NNPL (Nordic Network of Psychology and Law)
Publication year 2015
Published at Department of Psychology
Language en
Keywords strategic use of evidence, counter-interrogation strategies, denial
Subject categories Psychology

Abstract

Suspects can be a crucial source of information in cases where evidence is weak. This raises the question as to how to interview them to collect new and incriminating information. We compared two techniques derived from the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework (SUE-Confrontation and SUE-Confrontation/Explain) to an Early Disclosure of Evidence technique. Participants (N = 75) were asked to perform several mock criminal tasks before being interviewed as suspects. In the SUE conditions, statement-evidence inconsistencies were obtained by strategic interviewing. The interviewer confronted the suspects with these inconsistencies to inflate their perception of the amount of information s/he held about the critical phase of the crime (which lacked incriminating information). As a consequence, the suspects were expected to turn to more forthcoming counter-interrogation strategies. As predicted, the suspects in the SUE conditions (vs. the Early Disclosure condition) perceived the interviewer to have had more information about the critical phase. Furthermore, the suspects in the SUE-Confrontation condition disclosed more admissions about this particular phase compared to the suspects in the Early Disclosure condition. The findings will be discussed with a focus on the suspects’ counter-interrogation strategies in response to strategic interviewing.

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Denna text är utskriven från följande webbsida:
http://www.gu.se/english/research/publication/?publicationId=226502
Utskriftsdatum: 2020-05-29