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The incidence of respiratory symptoms in female Swedish hairdressers

Journal article
Authors Jonas Brisman
M. Albin
L. Rylander
Z. Mikoczy
Linnea Lillienberg
Anna Dahlman-Höglund
Kjell Torén
B. Meding
K. K. Diab
J. Nielsen
Published in Am J Ind Med
Volume 44
Issue 6
Pages 673-8.
Publication year 2003
Published at Institute of Community Medicine, Dept of Primary Health Care
Institute of Internal Medicine
Pages 673-8.
Language en
Links www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Subject categories Respiratory Medicine and Allergy

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Airway diseases in hairdressers are a concern. The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the risk for three respiratory symptoms, wheeze, dry cough, and nasal blockage, in hairdressers. METHODS: A questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, atopy, smoking, and work history was answered by 3,957 female hairdressers and 4,905 women from the general population as referents. Incidence rates (IR) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for the three symptoms were estimated. RESULTS: The IRs of all three studied symptoms were higher in the hairdressers compared with the referents. Smoking modified the effects of cohort affiliation for all three symptoms; the combined effect from hairdressing work and smoking was less than expected. In addition, the effect of cohort affiliation for wheeze was also modified by atopy, and the effect of cohort affiliation for nasal blockage was also modified by calendar year. CONCLUSIONS: Hairdressing work was associated with increased incidences of respiratory symptoms. Smoking had a negative modifying effect.

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