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The Craftsmanship in Construction and Transformation of Historic Tower Campaniles

Chapter in book
Authors Gunnar Almevik
Mattias Hallgren
Published in Building Histories: Proceedings of the Fourth Conference of the Construction History Society
Pages s. 133-144
ISBN 978-0-9928751-3-8
Publisher The Construction History Society
Place of publication Cambridge
Publication year 2017
Published at The Craft Laboratory - National centre for crafts in conservation
Department of Conservation
Pages s. 133-144
Language en
Keywords Historic building, campaniles, bell towers, wooden construction, medieval building, historic craftsmanship
Subject categories Archaeology, medieval, History of technology and industry, Architectural conservation and restoration, Building engineering

Abstract

In Sweden there are about 450 self-standing campaniles from the nineteenth century or before and approximately 6000 preserved church bells. Until recently the oldest preserved campanile was Härlöv (1485) in Växjö diocese. A survey and dendrochronological analysis of campaniles in Skara Diocese has identified at least seven campaniles from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. This paper aims to bring new information on the historic construction of wooden campaniles in central Scandinavia during the medieval period. In the research we investigate significant qualities of the construction and craftsmanship, how this type of medieval campaniles were built and raised and later restored and transformed. The medieval campanile in Grevbäck from about AD1300 is used as a case for in deep investigation.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
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