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Urban air pollution and effects on biomarkers of systemic inflammation and coagulation: a panel study in healthy adults

Journal article
Authors Sandra Johannesson
Eva M. Andersson
Leo Stockfelt
Lars Barregård
Gerd Sällsten
Published in Inhalation Toxicology
Volume 26
Issue 2
Pages 84-94
ISSN 0895-8378
Publication year 2014
Published at Institute of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Section of Occupational and environmental medicine
Pages 84-94
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.3109/08958378.2013.85...
Keywords Air pollution, biomarkers, healthy subjects, inflammation, panel study, particulate matter, AMERICAN-HEART-ASSOCIATION, INDIVIDUAL PARTICIPANT METAANALYSIS, FINE, PARTICULATE MATTER, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION, ADHESION MOLECULES, BLOOD MARKERS, CARE PROFESSIONALS, PULMONARY-DISEASE, OXIDATIVE STRESS, OCKHOLM, SWEDEN, V173, P35
Subject categories Clinical Medicine

Abstract

Context: Urban particulate air pollution is associated with cardiovascular diseases and mortality, possibly mediated through systemic inflammation and increased blood viscosity. Objectives: To examine short-term effects of exposure to urban air pollution on blood biomarkers for systemic inflammation and coagulation in a panel of healthy adults living in Gothenburg, Sweden. Materials and methods: The 16 volunteers, all non-smokers, median age 35 years, were called for blood sampling the morning after a day with high levels of urban particulate matter (PM10>30 mu g/m(3)) or a day with low levels (PM10<15 mu g/m(3) and NO2 <35 mu g/m(3)). Associations between exposure to air pollution and each biomarker (C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, serum amyloid A, coagulation factor VIII, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, p-selectin, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1, Clara cell protein 16 and surfactant protein D) were examined using a linear mixed-effects model. Results: In total, 12 sampling sessions were performed, six after high-pollution and six after low-pollution days, over 21 months. The ratio of air pollution levels between high-and low-pollution days was five for PM10 (median: 49 and 10 mg/m(3)) and two for NO2 (median: 47 and 24 mg/m(3)). No significant increase in blood levels of any of the biomarkers were seen after days with high air pollution levels compared with low levels. Conclusion: Biomarkers of inflammation and coagulation were not found to be significantly increased in the mornings after days with elevated levels of urban air pollution compared with low levels when performing repeated blood samplings in healthy volunteers.

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