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The prevalence of demarcated opacities in permanent first molars in a group of Swedish children.

Journal article
Authors Birgitta Jälevik
Gunilla Klingberg
Lars Barregård
Jörgen G Norén
Published in Acta odontologica Scandinavica
Volume 59
Issue 5
Pages 255-60
ISSN 0001-6357
Publication year 2001
Published at Institute of Odontology, Department of Pedodontics
Institute of Community Medicine
Pages 255-60
Language en
Links www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Keywords Child, Dental Enamel, abnormalities, Dental Enamel Hypoplasia, epidemiology, Dental Health Surveys, Humans, Molar, abnormalities, Prevalence, Sweden, epidemiology
Subject categories Paedodontics

Abstract

The permanent teeth of 516 7- and 8-year-old Swedish children from a low-fluoride area were examined for developmental enamel defects. Special attention was paid to demarcated opacities in permanent first molars and permanent incisors (MIH). The examination was done in their schools, using a portable light, a mirror, and a probe. The modified DDE index of 1992 was used for recording the enamel defects, supplemented with a further classification into severe, moderate, and mild defects. Demarcated opacities in permanent first molars were present in 18.4% of the children. The mean number of hypomineralized teeth of the affected children was 3.2 (standard deviation, 1.8), of which 2.4 were first molars. Of the children 6.5% had severe defects, 5% had moderate defects, whereas 7% had only mildly hypomineralized teeth. In conclusion, hypomineralized first molars appeared to be common and require considerable treatment in the Swedish child population.

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