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Using Gameplay Design Patterns to Support Children's Collaborative Interactions for Learning

Conference paper
Authors G. E. Baykal
E. Eriksson
Staffan Björk
Olof Torgersson
Published in CHI EA '19 Extended Abstracts of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
ISBN 978-1-4503-5971-9
Publisher IEEE
Publication year 2019
Published at Department of Computer Science and Engineering (GU)
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1145/3290607.3312889
Keywords Gameplay design patterns, game research, collaborative games, co-located gaming, CCI
Subject categories Human Computer Interaction

Abstract

Co-located games that bring players together have strong potential for supporting children's collaborative competencies. However, there is a challenge how to make results from research work related to this within Child-Computer Interaction (CCI) field easily transferable to future CCI research. Pursuing this challenge, we combined levels of Collaborative Activity (CA) with the design tool gameplay design patterns (GDPs). This combination was used to support comparative play tests of a co-located game with children who have learning difficulties. We report our observations on using our approach, arguing that the possibility of making patterns based on CA concepts such as Reflective Communication points towards collaborative GDPs. Furthermore, this study presents an exemplar that as a flexible and extensible tool GDPs can be used with different theories and models in the CCI field.

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