To the top

Page Manager: Webmaster
Last update: 9/11/2012 3:13 PM

Tell a friend about this page
Print version

Osseointegration and curr… - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
Sitemap
To content Read more about how we use cookies on gu.se

Contact form








 


Note! If you want an answer on a question you must specify your email address




Osseointegration and current interpretations of the bone-implant interface

Review article
Authors Furqan A. Shah
Peter Thomsen
Anders Palmquist
Published in Acta Biomaterialia
Volume 84
Pages 1-15
ISSN 1742-7061
Publication year 2019
Published at Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Biomaterials
Pages 1-15
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2018.11...
Keywords Bone-implant interface, Osseointegration, Biomineralisation, Osteocyte, Bone quality, Implant design, transmission electron-microscopy, beta-tricalcium phosphate, rabbit, cortical bone, titanium implants, dental implants, soft-tissue, ultrastructural characterization, substituted hydroxyapatite, surface-topography, intact interfaces
Subject categories Biomaterials Science

Abstract

Complex physical and chemical interactions take place in the interface between the implant surface and bone. Various descriptions of the ultrastructural arrangement to various implant design features, ranging from solid and macroporous geometries to surface modifications on the micron-, submicron-, and nano- levels, have been put forward. Here, the current knowledge regarding structural organisation of the bone-implant interface is reviewed with a focus on solid devices, mainly metal (or alloy) intended for permanent anchorage in bone. Certain biomaterials that undergo surface and bulk degradation are also considered. The bone-implant interface is a heterogeneous zone consisting of mineralised, partially mineralised, and unmineralised areas. Within the meso-micro-nano-continuum, mineralised collagen fibrils form the structural basis of the bone-implant interface, in addition to accumulation of non-collagenous macromolecules such as osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin. In the published literature, as many as eight distinct arrangements of the bone-implant interface ultrastructure have been described. The interpretation is influenced by the in vivo model and species-specific characteristics, healing time point(s), physico-chemical properties of the implant surface, implant geometry, sample preparation route(s) and associated artefacts, analytical technique(s) and their limitations, and non-compromised vs compromised local tissue conditions. The understanding of the ultrastructure of the interface under experimental conditions is rapidly evolving due to the introduction of novel techniques for sample preparation and analysis. Nevertheless, the current understanding of the interface zone in humans in relation to clinical implant performance is still hampered by the shortcomings of clinical methods for resolving the finer details of the bone-implant interface. Being a hierarchical material by design, the overall strength of bone is governed by composition and structure. Understanding the structure of the bone-implant interface is essential in the development of novel bone repair materials and strategies, and their long-term success. Here, the current knowledge regarding the eventual structural organisation of the bone-implant interface is reviewed, with a focus on solid devices intended for permanent anchorage in bone, and certain biomaterials that undergo surface and bulk degradation. The bone-implant interface is a heterogeneous zone consisting of mineralised, partially mineralised, and unmineralised areas. Within the meso-micro-nano-continuum, mineralised collagen fibrils form the structural basis of the bone-implant interface, in addition to accumulation of non-collagenous macromolecules such as osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin. (C) 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 9/11/2012
Share:

The University of Gothenburg uses cookies to provide you with the best possible user experience. By continuing on this website, you approve of our use of cookies.  What are cookies?