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Short-Term Surgical Outcome for Vestibular Schwannoma in Sweden: A Nation-Wide Registry Study.

Journal article
Authors Jiri Bartek
Petter Förander
Erik Thurin
Theresa Wangerid
Roger Henriksson
Göran Hesselager
Asgeir Store Jakola
Published in Frontiers in neurology
Volume 10
Pages 43
ISSN 1664-2295
Publication year 2019
Published at Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience
Pages 43
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.00043
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...
Subject categories Neurosurgery, Otoneurology

Abstract

Background: Vestibular Schwannoma (VS) is a benign neoplasm arising from the 8th cranial nerve, with surgery one of the treatment modalities. In a nation-wide registry study, we describe the baseline, treatment characteristics, and short-term outcome in patients surgically treated for VS. Methods: We performed a nationwide study with data from the Swedish Brain Tumor Registry (SBTR) for all adults diagnosed with VS 2009-2015. Patient symptoms, tumor characteristics, and postoperative complications were analyzed. Results: In total 348 patients underwent surgery for VS. Mean age was 50.6 ± 14.5 years and 165 patients (47.4%) were female. The most common symptom was focal neurological deficit (92.0%), with only 25 (7.2%) being asymptomatic prior to surgery, and 217 (63.6%) had no restriction in activity. Following surgery, 100 (28.7%) patients developed new deficit(s). In terms of postoperative complications; 11 (3.2%) had a hematoma, 35 (10.1%) an infection, 10 (2.9%) a venous thromboembolism, and 23 (6.6%) had a reoperation due to complication. There were no deaths within 30-days after surgery. When grouped according to tumor size (< 4 vs. ≥4 cm), those with ≥4 cm tumors were more often males (p = 0.02), had more often ICP related symptoms (p = 0.03) and shorter time from imaging to surgery (p < 0.01). Analysis of the younger (< 65 years) vs. elderly (≥65 years) revealed no difference in outcome except increased 1-year mortality (p = 0.002) in elderly. Conclusion: In this nation-wide registry-study, we benchmark the 30-day complication rate after VS surgery as collected by the SBTR. Further, we present the current neurosurgical outcome data from both VS smaller than 40 mm compared to larger tumors, as well as younger vs. elderly VS patients. Since surgical decision making is a careful consideration of short term risk vs. long term benefit, this information can be useful in clinical decision making.

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