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Legitimate Participation in the Classroom Context – Adding Learning Goals to Participatory Design

Conference paper
Authors Wolmet Barendregt
Mathilde M. Bekker
Peter Börjesson
Eva Eriksson
Olof Torgersson
Published in 15th International ACM Conference on Interaction Design and Children (IDC), Univ Cent Lancashire, England, JUN 21-24, 2016
Publisher Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Publication year 2016
Published at Department of Applied Information Technology (GU)
Language en
Links dx.doi.org/10.1145/2930674.2930686
Keywords Children, Participatory Design
Subject categories Human Computer Interaction

Abstract

In this paper we examine the challenges of introducing learning goals in Participatory Design (PD) activities in a school context. In order to increase the transparency of mutual learning in accordance with traditional PD values, we argue that learning through design approaches can inspire us to actively formulate learning goals, stage activities and include reflection as an integral part in the PD activity in order to meet those learning goals. We tested this approach in several master student projects, where the students were required to involve children in schools in the design of a technology. Our data analysis is based on their written reports as well as a specific exam question. We found that defining good learning goals was hard, but useful, especially when designing and discussing informed consent forms with teachers. Staging activities in order to meet the learning goals was possible, although learning goals were sometimes derived from the activities. Finally, incorporating moments of reflection for children was still difficult for our students because they felt pressed for time. We present some of the advantages and problems so that practitioners can consider the added value of this approach.

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