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Frida Espolin Norstein - University of Gothenburg, Sweden Till startsida
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Frida Espolin Norstein

Doctoral student

Frida Espolin Norstein
Doctoral student
frida.espolin.norstein@gu.se

Room number: 2310
Postal Address: Box 200, 40530 Göteborg
Visiting Address: Eklandagatan 86, plan 3 , 41261 Göteborg


Department of Historical Studies (More Information)
Box 200
405 30 Göteborg
www.historiskastudier.gu.se
historia@gu.se
Visiting Address: Eklandagatan 86 , 412 61 Göteborg

About Frida Espolin Norstein

My project's working title is: ”Female Burial in the Viking Diaspora”, and it is concerned with how women in the North Atlantic Viking settlements were remembered through funerary rituals.

The key questions are:

  • How is female Scandinavian identity expressed in the Viking diaspora and how does it differ between the various settlements?
  • Why are women remembered differently in different areas?


In order to answer these questions, I intend to examine furnished Scandinavian burials from the British Isles and Iceland. I will focus especially on the female burials, but it will be necessary to compare identity expression in these graves with those from male and ungendered burials. These burials are the end results of rituals performed by a community in order to deal with the death of one of its members. The burial form, place, position of the body and accompanying artefacts are therefore not reflections of the dead person in life, rather they are all factors actively chosen by the mourners, heavily influenced by traditions, but also open to manipulation. A study of these burials could reveal differences in practice between the areas, for example in terms of relative number of women buried and the cultural identity expressed in these burials (for instance through use of local or Scandinavian material culture). Such a study would contribute to our understanding of Viking Age female migrants and settlers, and it could also shed new light on the North Atlantic Viking settlements, both in terms of what unites them and also how they are different.

Page Manager: Webmaster|Last update: 4/19/2017
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