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Volvo Environment Prize laureates 2022
2022 Laureates: Richard Thompson, Tamara Galloway and Penelope Lindeque. "For ground breaking research that has been instrumental in providing societal awareness of plastic pollution as an emerging global challenge."
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Volvo Environment Prize seminars 2022

Science and Information Technology

Since the first award in 1990 the Volvo Environment Prize has become one of the scientific world’s most respected environmental prizes. Now you have the chance to listen to two of this year's award winners, Richard Thompson and Penelope Lindeque, that have conducted ground breaking research in understanding the impact of microplastics on humans and the environment.

Lecture,
Seminar
Date
30 Nov 2022
Time
09:30 - 12:00
Number of seats
80
Cost
Free

Good to know
Schedule for the seminar
​​​​​​​09:30-10:00: "Fika"
10:00-11:00: Penelope Lindeque
11:00-12:00: Richard Thompson
Organizer
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences

Small pieces of plastics are widely spread all over the world’s oceans and ingested by living creatures. Microplastics are found in zooplankton, fish, seabirds, whales, seals, and also in humans. Yet, the long-term effects of this plastic pollution threat are still largely unknown.

Bild på mikroplast i laboratorium
Microplastics collected from the oceans are studied at a University of Exeter laboratory in the UK. With the help of winds and ocean currents, microplastics have spread all over the planet.

With the help of winds and ocean currents, microplastics have spread all over the planet. The laureates have reported them in the Arctic deep sea and the snow on Mount Everest in the Himalayas.

The definition of microplastics is that they are no more than 5 millimeters in size; some are significantly smaller and only visible under a microscope. The microplastics found, even in the world’s most remote areas, result from a break-down from litter from the 360 million tons of plastic produced annually, used for packaging, cosmetics, car tyres, and numerous other items. Now microplastics in the marine environment are spread in the food chains, and intensive research is underway on environmental effects and how to prevent the spread of plastic waste through legislation and changes in design, production and disposal.

The jury for the Volvo Environment Prize points out that the three scientists have conducted  extensive research collaboration “that has been instrumental in providing societal awareness of plastic pollution as an emerging global challenge and triggering policy actions.”

Come and hear them talk about their research and results.

No pre-registration is necessary, but the number of places is limited so come early if you want to secure your spot.  

You can also follow the seminar via Zoom, you will find the link here and in the information box further up. 

Video (0:45)
Plastic Ocean – the spread of microplastics and what to do about it
The three scientists collaborate extensively. Today, Richard Thompson heads the International Marine Litter Unit at the University of Plymouth. Tamara Galloway, is Professor of Ecotoxicology and leads the plastics research team at University of Exeter and Penelope Lindeque, is Professor and Head of Science: Marine Ecology and Biodiversity at Plymouth Marine Laboratory. The trio’s research is seen as world-class.