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A freight ship in the sunset of an ocean.
Shipping's fuel is a polluting never-ending-story. Although stricter rules limit the sulfur content of fuels, other problems arise that involve increased risks to the marine environment.
Photo: Jens Rademacher, Unsplash
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Current ship fuels – a transfer of pollution from air to water?

Sustainability and environment
Society and economy

When new rules limiting the sulphur content of marine fuels were introduced in 2020, the expectation was that ships would switch to cleaner fuels. In reality, the ships now uses two other options instead. Even though emissions to air are reduced, these two options increase the risk of negative effects on the marine environment instead. In this FRAM Seminar, you get an overview of current regulation and identification of problems attached to hybrid fuels and scrubbers, based on recent research.

Seminar,
Webinar
Date
16 Dec 2021
Time
15:00 - 16:00
Location
Zoom, link will be sent out in the confirmation email.
Cost
Free of charge

Participants
FRAM Resarcher Ingela Dahllöf is a marine ecotoxicologist with a background in biogeochemistry and microbiology.
FRAM Researcher Christina Jönander is a PhD student who studies the effect of contaminant mixtures, mainly those related to shipping.
Ida-Maja Hassellöv is a Professor in Maritime Environmental Science at Chalmers University of Technology
Good to know
The time zone is CET.

This seminar was originally scheduled to 2 December.
Organizer
The FRAM Centre for Future Chemical Risk Assessment and Management Strategies

New, stricter rules limiting the sulphur content of marine fuels were introduced in 2020 with the aim to reduce sulphur emissions to air. The expectation was that ships would switch to cleaner, more expensive distilled fuels such as marine gas oil, or turn to alternatives like liquid gas, biogas or electrification.

Close to two years after the new regulations entered into force, we can see that two other alternatives dominate the market; use of a new types of petroleum-based low sulphur fuels known as hybrid fuels, or installation of an exhaust gas cleaning system that wash out sulphur of the exhaust, so called scrubbers. Although sulphur emissions to air are reduced with both of these alternatives, they give rise to other problems that increase the risk of negative effects on the marine environment.

This seminar will give a brief overview of current regulation and identification of problems attached to hybrid fuels and scrubbers, based on recent research.

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Three women
From left: Ida-Maja Hassellöv, Ingela Dahllöf and Christina Jönander
Photo: Chalmers, GU, GU