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Research News

  • 3D bioprinted human cartilage cells can be implanted

    [27 Mar 2017] Swedish researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy and Chalmers University of Technology have successfully induced human cartilage cells to live and grow in an animal model, using 3D bioprinting. The results will move development closer to a potential future in which it will be possible to help patients by giving them new body parts through 3D bioprinting.

  • Christopher Gillberg on the importance of being earnest in clinical research

    [22 Mar 2017] "If there's one thing I want to recommend to younger researchers, it is to always also stay clinically involved." Christopher Gillberg, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, is now moving to a role as senior professor. No question for him of slowing down as he enters his 68th year.

  • Varieties of Democracy Institute provides data for monitoring one of the UN Sustainable Development Goals

    [15 Mar 2017] At this week's meeting of the UN Statistical Commission meets in New York, the Varieties of Democracy Institute is featured as a key source for data when monitoring the UN Sustainable Development Goal 16.

  • Jan Holmgren awarded the world's greatest vaccine prize

    [15 Mar 2017] Jan Holmgren, senior professor in medical microbiology, is this year's recipient of the Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award. He receives the prize for his pioneering contribution to research relating to oral vaccines and mucous membrane immunology, and also for having led the development of the world's first efficient cholera vaccine.

  • Microwave helmet yields fast and safe evaluation of head injuries

    [15 Mar 2017] Results from a clinical study demonstrates that microwave measurements can be used for a rapid detection of intracranial bleeding in traumatic brain injuries. A recently published scientific paper shows that health care professionals get vital information and can quickly decide on appropriate treatment if patients are examined using a microwave helmet.

  • Children's Daily Life Highly Regulated

    [15 Mar 2017] Children in Sweden and the US experience their daily life as highly structured and regulated. But while US children state that homework and long schooldays are what makes everyday life difficult, Swedish children point to the continuous nagging and stress that occur in relation to daily routines. These are some key findings of a new study from the University of Gothenburg.

  • A trend reversal in childhood obesity - a decline in the BMI in 8-year-old boys

    [15 Mar 2017] After decades of increasing childhood obesity, things are now going in the opposite direction. A study from Sahlgrenska Academy shows that among 8-year-old boys in Sweden, the percentage of boys suffering from overweight or obesity has decreased to their lowest levels since the early 1990s.

  • Resettlement of internally displaced persons is affected by multiple factors

    [15 Feb 2017] Processes of resettling internally displaced persons are affected by a range of different factors that policymakers need to take into account. This is concluded in a newly completed PhD thesis from the University of Gothenburg on internal displacement and resettlement in Sri Lanka.

  • Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea

    [13 Feb 2017] Researchers from University of Gothenburg and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) show that both species diversity and habitat diversity are critical to understand the functioning of ecosystems.

  • Gut feeling essential for migrating fish

    [13 Feb 2017] Why do trout spend so much time in potentially dangerous estuaries before migrating to sea? In a new thesis published at the University of Gothenburg, Jeroen Brijs reveals that the answer may lie in the gut.

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